I research forms of attention from a qualitative-humanistic perspective. My writings explicate the social construction of attention, which occurs between the cultural integration of technology and the rhetorical agency of individuals.  Case studies help me theorize modes of communicative engagement that suggest underlying dynamics of attention formation (and thus of interpretation and participation) in contemporary media. 


Revise and Resubmit/Under Review

Music Performativity in the Album: Mingus’s Jazz and Nietzsche’s Aesthetics in the 20th Century Commodity Form. Top Paper, National Communication Association, Performance Studies Division, Nov 2016.  (Under Review for Text and Performance Quarterly, submitted Feb 2017, revised and resubmitted May 2017)

Gaming Google, Playing Its Spiders: Practicing Rhetoric Within Search Engines’ Evolving Information Ecologies. (Under Review for Explorations in Media Ecology, submitted Sept 2016, received revise and resubmit Sept 2017)

The “Roots” of Philosophy: Metaphysical Implications of Arabic’s and English’s Grammar and Semantics. Co-author Summer Loomis. (Submitted to Journal of World Philosophies June 2017)

Can’t Use It But Finding Ways: Dubai Student Narratives of Mobile Phones in the Classroom. Co-author Bradley Freeman. (Submitted to International Journal of Multicultural Education July 2017)

Aristotle’s Theory of Attention in the Rhetoric: A Plurality of Means. (Submitted to Southern States Communication Association Oct 2017)

In Progress

The Dialog Laboratory: a Student-Centered Experiential Method for Any Discipline (in progress via Provost’s research grant, expected submission to International Journal of Teaching and Learning in Higher Education)

Kenneth Burke’s Theory of Attention: Homo Symbolicus Attentio. (in progress for KBJ: The Journal of the Kenneth Burke Society)

Marshall McLuhan’s Theory of Attention: Media Dialectics as Hidden Grounds of Sense. (in progress for Explorations in Media Ecology)

Dissertation (2015)

The Attention Situation: A Rhetorical Theory of Attention for Mediated Communication. [Abstract]
Winner: The Harold A. Innis Award for Outstanding Dissertation in the Field of Media Ecology, Media Ecology Association